Gurgaon Reviews by Critics

Average Rating of All 'Gurgaon ' Review - 3.2 stars

Gurgaon Review by Sweta Kaushal on Hindustan Times

Rating: ★★★½☆

The narrative is, however, scarily slow. Though it works for some parts, it also takes away the thrill most of the times. Shanker lingers too much at almost every nook and corner of his twisty tale and that stops Gurgaon from becoming a gripping thriller. They could have easily done away with a good 15-20 minutes of the film for a sharper impact and intense experience.

Gurgaon Review by Kunal Guha on Mumbai Mirror

Rating: ★★★☆☆

Cinematographer turned director Shanker Raman assembles a compelling story and despite the laboured character introductions and elaborate setup, he gets down to business in the second half. Crisply edited by Shaan Mohammed — his contribution lends the film a distinct pace and mood. Cinematographer Vivek Shah captures the proceedings well and the dump yard sequence is particularly memorable even though little transpires in the said scene.

Gurgaon Review by Mayank Shekhar on Mid-Day India

Rating: ★★★☆☆

This film is what you could call the ‘Versova noir’ thriller—dark, atmospheric, moody, inevitably set in North India, where violence is the key instrument, whether you’re negotiating love or hate. The relatability and realism of it all, despite the hasty simplicities in the plot, add much to the character.

Review by Nihit Bhave on The Times Of India

Rating: ★★★☆☆

The performers swoop in where the courage of the filmmaker flails. Tripathi splendidly plays a man whose ghosts have caught up to him; Oberoi humanizes his all-out-evil character; Khanna is feisty, but saddled with an uneven role and Vatsa’s restrained performance prevents her character from becoming a stereotypical Nirupa Roy-type. Unlike its namesake city, Gurgaon isn’t messy enough and doesn’t leave you gasping for air. But it provides a temporary taste of the dark side.

Review by Manisha Lakhe on Nowrunning

Rating: ★★★½☆

Some will say there’s too much of the Haryanvi dialect of Hindi being spoken in the film. There is that, but the raw language gnaws at you from the inside forcing you to look at the dark side of men. This film will not let you look away from the screen. You may not want to know people like those shown in the movie, but when you step out into the mall attached to the multiplex after the film, you might not want to go shopping. The film is that powerful.

Review by Sreehari Nair on Rediff

Rating: ★★★★☆

Shanker Raman knows that for Gurgaon to work, it must first establish a certain distance from the viewer. He gives us that distance so that we get both the heat of the orgy and its murder. The film is supremely entertaining, and we may often find ourselves envying the vitality of its characters’ lawlessness and also sharing their daze. But just as we get caught up in all that, Raman suddenly pulls the rug out.

Review by Shubhra Gupta on Indian Express

Rating: ★★½☆☆

That’s made up for, almost, by the terrific ensemble cast. Tripathi’s growly patriarch who is being eaten up from the inside but is still clinging on to his perch, is splendid. So is Bashir, as his younger brother who comes to his rescue when all else fails. Khanna and Vatsa, as daughter and mother, stand out too. Everyone else, including Oberoi and Varma, fits right in. Gurgaon is dark and dystopic, and a solid, atmospheric debut. It tells us that power can never be permanent, and how the good may not always win. Uncomfortable, but true.

Review by Saibal Chatterjee on NDTVMovies

Rating: ★★★★☆

Gurgaon does not rely on big-bang drama for effect. It focuses instead on the vile ways in which avarice and distrust spread venom and cloud judgment. Despite its limited wingspan, the film lifts off and flies smoothly purely on the strength of the evocative and effective atmospherics created by director of photography Vivek Shah and sound designer Mohandas PV. The captivating back-and-forth rhythm that editor Shan Mohammed lends to the film adds another layer to this intense movie experience.

Gurgaon Review by Indiaglitz

Rating: ★★½☆☆

The finale part seemed forced and pretentious. In order to do something different or something daring the writers have added few sudden twists, which fails to do justice to the theme of the film. These scenes could have been much better. The second half of the film fails to match up to the expectations set by the brilliant first half of the film. Director Shanker Raman should have worked bit hard over the culmination of his characters. Also, one can find the influence of many films in the second half of the movie. The character of Akshay Oberoi needed more justification. Gurgaon’ is a dark slow pace thriller which will be cherished only by all those who love this genre.

Review by Vishal Verma on Glamsham

Rating: ★★☆☆☆

You feel sympathetic towards Preet and Ragini Khanna does a decent act, the kidnaper from the slums shows some positivity otherwise in all its cynicism, GURGAON is damaged by its dissolute characters whose human conditions are unconvincing and unearned in this moody noir study of psychotic human behavior that may attract some festival nerds abroad but for an Indian viewer it gets overstretched and sordidly difficult.

Review by Suparna Sharma on Deccan Chronicle

Rating: ★★★½☆

The film’s script, screenplay — by Shanker Raman, Sourabh R, Vipin Bhatti, Yogi Singha — and dialogue soaked in the flavour of the city and its ethos. The language we hear — violent, abusive, is born of a world that’s long gone — a world of farm lands, cow, milk and water. Gurgaon has an exceptional cast of actors. Pankaj Tripathi, as the always drunk Kehri Singh, speaks little, but controls the film. His grip over it loosening a bit when Aamir Bashir arrives. OMG!! Where has he been all this while? He invests Bhupi with a menacing mix of a dark past and a sharp focus on the task at hand. Akshay Oberoi’s Nikki Singh is like a double-edge sword. A man so desperate and disturbed that the only way he can feel he is alive is by watching someone writhing in pain. Don’t miss it.

Review by Shantanu David on News18

Rating: ★★★½☆

Director Shanker Raman grew up in the NCR region and it shows. Every frame of the film fabulously captures a different facet of Gurgaon, with nary a wasted shot. From the glittering facade of towering steel and glass buildings to the scarred and pitted roads that wind between them, from the highly westernised nightclubs with booming English music to the thet Jat language and attitudes that space within and outside them, every nuance of the city is presented in a wholly uncompromising light. There are fast foreign cars and long jams at toll booths, there’s foreign liquor juxtaposed against ghee ke ladoos and paranthas and everyone is some baap ka beta. While it all does lead to some comedy, it also causes conflict, and the easy availability of guns probably doesn’t help, at least if you’re at the wrong end of the barrel.

Review by IANS on Sify

Rating: ★★★★☆

Till the very end of this violent saga of internecine devastation, we are given clues and glimpses into minds and hearts that are governed by greed and felled by opportunism. The editing (Shan Mohamed) gives the narrative the appearance of a wound-up clenched crisis. The cinematographer Vivek Shah captures the city of ambition, greed and destruction with a flamboyance that secretes a deep hurt and wound. These are characters born to doom. God bless them.

 

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