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Raaz 3 Review

Critic Score 42

Good- 6

Average- 5

Bad- 6

Total- 17

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Overall

42

Above Average

 
 

 

Indicine Review

 
Indicine | Indicine Team

Raaz 3 starts well, the director wastes no time and quickly establishes the plot and the characters. The first half has some thrilling moments and Vikram Bhatt’s who specialises in directing horror films, has complete control over proceedings.

Bipasha Basu gets everything right – her expressions, look, body language and dialogue delivery is spot on. She is the star of Raaz 3. Emraan Hashmi sleep walks through his role, he’s done this several times before. Esha Gupta is strictly okay. Manish Choudhary is very good.

50

Average Movie
 
 

Critics Reviews

 
Bollywood Hungama | Taran Adars

Vikram Bhatt, who helmed the blockbuster hit RAAZ in 2002, is back with the third installment. He pursues the journey of a fading superstar's vengeance against a rising star adroitly. RAAZ 3 is suitably atmospheric, full of character and sensibly spine-chilling. The film relies less on shock value and more on a well-told tale, leading to a stimulating finale. Besides, Vikram has mastered this genre by now. He knows exactly how to make a scene sinister without making it appear ludicrous. The Bhatts are known for presenting sex and passion aesthetically and this one is no different. The lovemaking scene between Emraan and Bipasha in particular is way too titillating.

70

Recommended
 
 
Koimoi | Roshni Devi

She’s evil, she’s manipulative, she’s power-hungry, but Bipasha Basu steals the show left, right and center as Shanaya. Emraan Hashmi has 2-3 staple expressions throughout the movie, but that’s more because of the script’s shortcoming. Esha Gupta is stiff as Sanjana but does much better towards the end (when she almost goes berserk). Manish Choudhary is good as the evil spirit.

20

Not Recommended
 
 
Yahoo | Kunal Guha

If Bipasha Basu had a career, it would be ruined. But since she doesn't, there's little that this film can take away from her. Her character isn't possessed but that doesn't stop her from rolling on the floor or laughing deliriously or doing anything that would suggest an unsound mind. Esha Gupta is a stunning portrait of a beautiful girl playing poker. While she makes a pretty face on the screen, she can't create creases on it to form any recognizable expression. Even in the scene where her character realizes that she has been cheated, all she does is cover her ears. Perhaps the reason she couldn't hear the director scream, "Emote! Emote!" Emraan Hashmi has now moved on to a league of actors who can't be dispirited for being associated with a possible Ghanta award winner. He takes his role as seriously as he could but his efforts couldn't exorcise the devilishly terrible plot from spelling doom for this film.

10

Not Recommended
 
 
Glamsham | Martin D'Souza

Exactly my view; but sadly, RAAZ 3 disengages the viewer from the plot, the movie and ejects a few from the theatre halfway through. The few that are left have no option but humour themselves with 'smart alec' comments to keep boredom at bay.

Nothing works, not even the 3D effects, except for one or two scenes where you feel objects are being hurled at you. The plot has no spine, the screenplay is atrocious, even Bipasha Basu is forced in her acting while Esha Gupta tries her best to enact a scene. That leaves us with a few extras and Emraan Hashmi; he gets his staple scenes of two good lip locks.

20

Not Recommended
 
 
Dailybhaskar | Mayank Shekhar

During this daring process, the priest gets suddenly beheaded — there’s nothing over his neck. The hero and the heroine rush out of the cemetery. This must’ve been a traumatic experience. You’d imagine they would be shivering in shock at home. No. The hero’s Emraan Hashmi. The female lead (Esha Gupta) looks suspiciously like Mrinalini Sharma, who made her debut with Raaz (2002). This is Raaz 3. Hashmi immediately locks his lips with the heroine’s. Romantic music takes over right then. They make intensely passionate love. The audience laughs. If only comedies could produce the kind of laughs this horror of horrors often does. Like me, everyone must have walked into the cinema, nearly empty, late in the night, with no one even in the hallways of the mall, hoping to get scared. They see no ghosts. Everyone looks bored.

20

Not Recommended
 
 
Rediff | Preeti Arora

Raaz 3's A certification applies, if anything, only to the sleazy sex scenes. The rest of the film could have been slightly scary, if only Vikram Bhatt had bothered to plagiarize things correctly in the first place.

In Raaz 3, probably the most repelling scene is when Taradutt, a 'pret-aatma' who looks like an exhumed corpse, propositions Bipasha Basu to sleep with him... and she accepts. There is a very sincere attempt at constructing more stylized, urbane characters with 'F' words making appearances in the dialogue every now and then. Only, it sounds corny.

These sexual bizarre-isms aside, there is a fundamental flaw that pervades most of Vikram Bhatt's work. His films lack reason. Things just seem to happen from out of nowhere either for the sake of convenience

30

Not Recommended
 
 
Zeenews | Ananya Bhattacharya

The film’s technical aspects are commendable. Vikram Bhatt is the man who brought 3D horror films to the country, and in his third rendezvous with the technique, he has performed really well. After ‘Haunted 3D’ and ‘Dangerous Ishq’, the third film from the director is actually brilliant as far as the 3D is concerned. Several scenes stand out among the plethora of enlarged insects and objects flying towards the audience; and the one where Sanjana is attacked by innumerable cockroaches deserves a special mention. I’m not very scared of cockroaches as such, but henceforth when a cockroach flies at me, I might have to scream out loud.

60

Recommended
 
 
Indiaglitz | Joginder Tuteja

Within first 10 minutes of the film you know that director Vikram Bhatt didn't have any intention whatsoever to beat around the bush. The relationships are established, the plot set, the drama kick-starts and the film takes on the fourth gear the moment Bipasha encounters an 'aatma' (Manish Chaudhary).

This is where Vikram brings in a different way of narrating a horror tale (which could otherwise have become predictable). With Bipasha in a venomous mode, one would have expected her making scary faces, giving a tilt to her neck, as seen in many psycho theme movies with camera angles assisting in enhancing her performances. None of that happens here though as Bipasha looks and sounds danger but just by her dialogue delivery and scheming body language.

70

Recommended
 
 
The Times Of India | Madhureeta Mukherjee

With a storyline that's fairly simple with one-dimensional characters, Vikram Bhatt, dishes out this horror show (which turns 'horny' as hell at times) in 3D, with glossy production values (and cliched elements like the usual fog, kabrastans and howling voiceovers aplenty), dollops of sex, horror and a few terrifying scenes. The 3D effect isn't state-of-the-art, but a few innovative scenes impress. The music, however, is disappointing for a Bhatt film, with songs used as patches between insignificant scenes.

60

Recommended
 
 
Bollywood Llife | Reza Noorani

The horror in the film taps into the black magic stories we’ve all heard and manages to evoke a few gasps. The ghosts fail miserably, yet the story is strong and convincing enough to carry the movie. The vamp act comes naturally to Bipasha and she manages her role as a jealous star as well as she can! Esha, however, is just a pretty face in the film and needs to put in some serious work on her acting skills, but since she is knocked out cold in a good part of the film, it saves you suffering her hamming act on screen for too long, in 3D too! Emraan, on the other hand, does a good job, but it is evident that he’s struggling to move out of the Bhatt camp and use his talent elsewhere. The Bhatts have toned down the sleaze and focussed more on the story instead this time around, which may disappoint audiences, since the Raaz franchise is known for its steamy sequences – though perhaps Jism does it better – and it’s a good call they take.

60

Recommended
 
 
Nowrunning | Mansha Rastogi

Keep aside the story; even the thrills and chills in the film disappoint you. Not that I say the 3D does wonders to the film, but had that novelty been removed too, Raaz 3 would've fallen flat on its face. The 3D technique is decent at best and as Vikram has been claiming in interviews it has an immersive quality in it. However, with the story failing to appease you one bit, you wouldn't want to get immersed in a film like Raaz 3.

20

Not Recommended
 
 
India Today | Vinayak Chakravorty

For all the publicity clamour, the scares remain pretty mediocre. Raaz 3 is a horror film that clearly had its priorities elsewhere. The focus was on rolling out a vintage Bhatt package and the film doesn't try doing much else. It is a love triangle, Emraan Hashmi plays the sly fox who nonetheless has his heart in the right place, the heroine is a damsel in distress (in this case, distress is defined by Bipasha and her black magic), and there is enough sleaze and sleazy dialogues. If that mix sounds like the raaz behind all Bhatt hits, this film keeps it together.

40

Not Recommended
 
 
DNA India | Aniruddha Guha

The Bhatt brothers, Mahesh and Mukesh, are probably the most stagnant lot in B-town currently. Their horror films resemble the horror films they made years ago. Their erotic thrillers are a poor clone of similar films they made in the past. Back in their fold is former protégé Vikram Bhatt (not related), who branched out to make some forgettable films before making last year’s most awful but unintentionally entertaining masterpiece – Haunted 3D. Raaz 3 has an edge over Haunted 3D in the sense that it’s not as stupidly absurd – in the latter, a ghost raped a living person; in the former a ghost has consensual sex with a human. That little improvement apart, there is a scant change in sensibility.

40

Not Recommended
 
 
Indian Express | Shubhra Gupta

Bhatt’s an old hand at horror, going back and forth in time, doing Victorian and contemporary, and, on occasion, medieval. Here, he sticks to the here and now, making Bollywood the backdrop : the film industry, going by scores of unpublished, ear-scorching accounts, is the place where anything can happen. So we are quite prepared to believe that Shanaya’s bitterness and envy has caused her to come unhinged, and her passes at the guy who hands her the tools for Sanjana’s destruction, lead to a couple of shivery moments in the first half.

40

Not Recommended
 
 
Deccan Chronicle | Khalid Mohamed

Sure, suspension of disbelief is mandatory. At the same time, the script has to be compact, brisk, without raising the question: why-why-why? Like the very idea of a popular heroine getting murderous on losing out an award to a Girl-come-lately, is flimsy.

If you’re still in your seat, it’s essentially for the stray scary 3-D effect, the scream blasts, and Bipasha Basu who goes at her part like a starving person offered a club sandwich. Her role is abbreviated sadly; it could have been way more fleshed out, but whenever given the opportunity to break into dramatic high-jinks, she makes Emraan Hashmi look like a schoolboy. Esha Gupta, if she has dubbed her own dialogue, is quite okay. Manish Choudhary as the Linen Devil, is sufficiently kureeepy.

40

Not Recommended
 
 
ApunKaChoice | Nikhil Kumar

To his credit, Vikram Bhatt has this time chosen a subject that’s far less outlandish, but he fails to infuse novelty in the scares. The evil spirits being invoked in graveyards, the hands popping out of a TV screen to throttle the young heroine, clowns wandering about in her haunted house, the babas, tantrics and all doing mysterious rituals and mouthing mumbo-jumbo mantras are not exactly one’s idea of good horror. That said, a few macabre sequences do stand out. Like when Esha Gupta is mauled by thousands of flying cockroaches or when maggot-infested ghouls make an appearance, which, when seen with 3D effects, do appear popping out of the screen, and it’s not without a careful peep into the popcorn bucket for the creepy-crawlies that a viewer thereafter proceeds with ritual munching.

50

Average Movie
 
 
Sify | Sonia Chopra

Bipasha Basu excels as the unstable Shanaya. Despite the character being downright evil, she manages to bring a hint of vulnerability to the performance. Interestingly, she thinks of herself as the victim and in her own head has justified her deeds believing that “she has no choice”. Esha Gupta is awkward as the film starts but manages a fairly impressive performance. Emraan Hashmi gives a weak performance and gamely lets the ladies take center-stage.

60

Recommended
 
 

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